Monday, July 21, 2014

Manufacturing and Supply Chain Design - MIT - Open Courseware

Every manufacturing manager has to know what customer wants and must be able to design a system that produces what the customer wants at a profit. No doubt a manager can take the help of many specialists in this activity and also consultants.

The course on Manufacturing and Supply Chain Design by MIT is an interesting course in this respect.

Full course lectures are available in the course page.

Faculty Stephen Graves

Some Information of the Course

Main topic covered in the course.

Manufacturing system design

Supply chain design: network
optimization, sourcing, pricing

Flexibility and capacity planning

Manufacturing system design

For the design process, Graves gives the following sequence

Design Process
• Benchmarking and best practices
• Development of design concept
• Development of design guidelines
• Detailed design process
• Development of personnel and material requirements
• Installation and verification of processes  and procedures

Technology selection is an important issue in manufacturing system design and Graves has not included it in the step. Technology has a relationship to capital requirement and manpower requirement and hence optimal decision is an economic one. Capital costs and manpower costs over the life of the technology decide the technology choice whenever alternatives exist.

Friday, July 4, 2014

Viral Marketing - An Exploration

What is viral marketing?

Viral marketing is one of the four online marketing communication avenues

1. Email marketing
2. Search engine marketing
3. Social media marketing
4. Viral marketing

In viral marketing the focus is on creating a message in the form a text, video, image or infographic which people share quickly via mail and social networks and thus the communication reaches a large number of people. The original communicator has to create the message that creates the excitement and the urge to share.
The Six Simple Principles of Viral Marketing
by Dr. Ralph F. Wilson, E-Commerce Consultant
Web Marketing Today, February 1, 2005. Originally published 2/1/2000


I admit it. The term "viral marketing" is offensive. Call yourself a Viral Marketer and people will take two steps back. I would. "Do they have a vaccine for that yet?" you wonder. A sinister thing, the simple virus is fraught with doom, not quite dead yet not fully alive, it exists in that nether genre somewhere between disaster movies and horror flicks.

But you have to admire the virus. He has a way of living in secrecy until he is so numerous that he wins by sheer weight of numbers. He piggybacks on other hosts and uses their resources to increase his tribe. And in the right environment, he grows exponentially. A virus doesn't even have to mate -- he just replicates, again and again with geometrically increasing power, doubling with each iteration:


In a few short generations, a virus population can explode.

Viral Marketing Defined
What does a virus have to do with marketing? Viral marketing describes any strategy that encourages individuals to pass on a marketing message to others, creating the potential for exponential growth in the message's exposure and influence. Like viruses, such strategies take advantage of rapid multiplication to explode the message to thousands, to millions.

Off the Internet, viral marketing has been referred to as "word-of-mouth," "creating a buzz," "leveraging the media," "network marketing." But on the Internet, for better or worse, it's called "viral marketing." While others smarter than I have attempted to rename it, to somehow domesticate and tame it, I won't try. The term "viral marketing" has stuck.

The Classic Example
The classic example of viral marketing is, one of the first free Web-based e-mail services. The strategy is simple:

1.Give away free e-mail addresses and services,
2.Attach a simple tag at the bottom of every free message sent out: "Get your private, free email at" and,
3.Then stand back while people e-mail to their own network of friends and associates,
4.Who see the message,
5.Sign up for their own free e-mail service, and then
6.Propel the message still wider to their own ever-increasing circles of friends and associates.
Like tiny waves spreading ever farther from a single pebble dropped into a pond, a carefully designed viral marketing strategy ripples outward extremely rapidly.

Elements of a Viral Marketing Strategy
Accept this fact. Some viral marketing strategies work better than others, and few work as well as the simple strategy. But below are the six basic elements you hope to include in your strategy. A viral marketing strategy need not contain ALL these elements, but the more elements it embraces, the more powerful the results are likely to be. An effective viral marketing strategy:

1.Gives away products or services
2.Provides for effortless transfer to others
3.Scales easily from small to very large
4.Exploits common motivations and behaviors
5.Utilizes existing communication networks
6.Takes advantage of others' resources
Let's examine at each of these elements briefly.

1. Gives away valuable products or services
"Free" is the most powerful word in a marketer's vocabulary. Most viral marketing programs give away valuable products or services to attract attention. Free e-mail services, free information, free "cool" buttons, free software programs that perform powerful functions but not as much as you get in the "pro" version. Wilson's Second Law of Web Marketing is "The Law of Giving and Selling" ( "Cheap" or "inexpensive" may generate a wave of interest, but "free" will usually do it much faster. Viral marketers practice delayed gratification. They may not profit today, or tomorrow, but if they can generate a groundswell of interest from something free, they know they will profit "soon and for the rest of their lives" (with apologies to "Casablanca"). Patience, my friends. Free attracts eyeballs. Eyeballs then see other desirable things that you are selling, and, presto! you earn money. Eyeballs bring valuable e-mail addresses, advertising revenue, and e-commerce sales opportunities. Give away something, sell something.

2. Provides for effortless transfer to others
Public health nurses offer sage advice at flu season: stay away from people who cough, wash your hands often, and don't touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. Viruses only spread when they're easy to transmit. The medium that carries your marketing message must be easy to transfer and replicate: e-mail, website, graphic, software download. Viral marketing works famously on the Internet because instant communication has become so easy and inexpensive. Digital format make copying simple. From a marketing standpoint, you must simplify your marketing message so it can be transmitted easily and without degradation. Short is better. The classic is: "Get your private, free email at" The message is compelling, compressed, and copied at the bottom of every free e-mail message.

3. Scales easily from small to very large
To spread like wildfire the transmission method must be rapidly scalable from small to very large. The weakness of the Hotmail model is that a free e-mail service requires its own mailservers to transmit the message. If the strategy is wildly successful, mailservers must be added very quickly or the rapid growth will bog down and die. If the virus multiplies only to kill the host before spreading, nothing is accomplished. So long as you have planned ahead of time how you can add mailservers rapidly you're okay. You must build in scalability to your viral model.

4. Exploits common motivations and behaviors
Clever viral marketing plans take advantage of common human motivations. What proliferated "Netscape Now" buttons in the early days of the Web? The desire to be cool. Greed drives people. So does the hunger to be popular, loved, and understood. The resulting urge to communicate produces millions of websites and billions of e-mail messages. Design a marketing strategy that builds on common motivations and behaviors for its transmission, and you have a winner.

5. Utilizes existing communication networks
Most people are social. Nerdy, basement-dwelling computer science grad students are the exception. Social scientists tell us that each person has a network of 8 to 12 people in their close network of friends, family, and associates. A person's broader network may consist of scores, hundreds, or thousands of people, depending upon her position in society. A waitress, for example, may communicate regularly with hundreds of customers in a given week. Network marketers have long understood the power of these human networks, both the strong, close networks as well as the weaker networked relationships. People on the Internet develop networks of relationships, too. They collect e-mail addresses and favorite website URLs. Affiliate programs exploit such networks, as do permission e-mail lists. Learn to place your message into existing communications between people, and you rapidly multiply its dispersion.

6. Takes advantage of others' resources
The most creative viral marketing plans use others' resources to get the word out. Affiliate programs, for example, place text or graphic links on others' websites. Authors who give away free articles, seek to position their articles on others' webpages. A news release can be picked up by hundreds of periodicals and form the basis of articles seen by hundreds of thousands of readers. Now someone else's newsprint or webpage is relaying your marketing message. Someone else's resources are depleted rather than your own.

"Copyright © 2000, 2005, Ralph F. Wilson, E-Mail Marketing and Online Marketing editor, Web Marketing Today. All rights reserved. Permission granted to reprint this article on your website without alteration if you include this copyright statement and leave the hyperlinks live and in place."


Webby Awards for Viral Marketing Campaigns 2013-14 in 2014

Advertisement for a transmission service company

Uploaded 29 April 2013 - 4,174,502 views on 4 July 2014

Music of Zack Sobiech and his fight against Cancer


Uploaded 3 May 2013 12,778,944 views

Jaguar attacks Crocodile


Uploaded by National Geographic on 26 Sep 2013

More Articles and Papers on Web

Spreading the Brand Message through Viral Marketing (2005 paper)

The New Rules of Viral Marketing, Presentation, David Meerman Scott

Viral Marketing for the Real World

Book Review of Connected Marketing, the Viral, Buzz, and Word of Mouth Revolution

Originally posted at
Migrated to here.

Updated 4 July 2014, 19 Dec 2011